WHO SHOULD CARE ABOUT PRIVACY?


Citizens of totalitarian regimes

Totalitarian -- The state is the totality, the citizens are nothing. The common people exist for the benefit of the state. Repression, surveillance, distrust are the order of the day.

 

MarpX Good Privacy is for you. You are actually a primary motive for this project -- your dignity as human beings is to asserted in the face of the indignities heaped upon you by your rulers.

"Laws just or unjust may govern men's actions. Tyrannies may restrain or regulate their words. The machinery of propaganda may pack their minds with falsehood and deny them truth for many generations of time. But the soul of man thus held in trance or frozen in a long night can be awakened by a spark coming from God knows where, and in a moment the whole structure of lies and oppression is on trial for its life. People in bondage need never despair." -- Winston S. Churchill, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, March 31, 1949

Did it ever strike you that the regime is afraid of you? An insight from the British Raj in India: "If they all rose up and spit upon us, we would drown." A regime can pick off and punish individuals, but if many people share communications privately and stand in solidarity, the people will eventually triumph.

 

MarpX Good Privacy is free and available for download anywhere in the world. If it proves not strong enough, we will gladly strengthen it beyond its current protection of eight billion possible different keys. Overwhelm government surveillance by your numbers. Strike a blow for freedom!

Cybersecurity and national security personnel

Consider the mere abstract possibility that a quantum-hacking-proof method of privatizing content might arise out of nowhere (Steubenville, Ohio to be exact) from a nobody who is neither a cybersecurity expert nor even a computer scientist. Next, consider the stark reality that the U.S. Government through its Patent and Trademark Office published the method on May 23, 2019 in its publication number US 2019/0158271 A1. Chances are that a unit of the People's Liberation Army in China carries out effective environmental scanning and has already picked up on the method. Certainly there are many similar organizations hostile to the United States that would love to make their worlds go totally dark while the U.S. continues to strew cyberspace with accessible files and messages.

 

It's time to check out our claim about privacy using Extreme Encryption. A challenge: Encrypt some files yourselves. If you can discover in them patterns that open the way to attacks, get in touch with us [contact@marpx.com or Colonel John Scott Esq. at 740 275-4505]. With this design, it's relatively easy to strengthen the pattern busting without noticable time costs to the user. As for the computational infeasibility part of the claim, that is grounded in high school level arithmetic that you can prove to yourselves in very short order. And if you believe quantum computing will rise to hundred-digit-long quantities of possibile solutions per second, we can in turn scale up our software's strength to multi-thousand-digit-long levels of resistance.

 

USPTO publication US 2019/0158271 A1 might be a useful contribution in face of the United States' multi-hundred-billion dollar annual cost of information theft each year. The software, including the free version, is available at https://BuyExtremeEncryption.com. Try it out. Learn more. If you like what you see, consider collaborating with us.

Government units suffering cyber thefts / cyber invasions

The U.S. Navy? The National Security Agency? Good grief, is no-one exempt?

 

The tragedy is that getting government attention is difficult. (How is that for understatement?). Hey, there, you folks in the traffic jam in Dupont Circle, greetings from a million miles away, from the Ohio Sixth Congressional District. (Yes, we know that the D.C. part of "Washington D.C." does not stand for Dupont Circle, but it sure feels that way when you are caught in traffic.)

Businesses with proprietary information

By now, everyone is familiar with the adage: "There are two kinds of organizations -- those whose know that their computer system has been hacked, and those who do not yet know that their computer system has been hacked." First prize for dumb strategies: Include your customers' social security numbers in your database. That invites hackers to come back often, because they realize the value of easily cross-linked data. (Take a bow, Columbia Gas of Ohio.)

 

We agree that information held in interactive data base management systems is notoriously hard to protect. But why leave the design drawings, the technical papers, the back-and-forth messages, the basic knowledge of your firm up for grabs to anyone who can get by your firewall? Your firm's value is rooted in your people and in accumulated understanding of how to create value for customers. Why give that away? Privacy, anyone?

People who are fed up with constant invasions of their privacy

Privacy is invaded on every conceivable front. Telemarketers annoy. Robo calls antagonize. PSM ("Please Send Money") junk mail floods the mailbox. The parade is relentless. It's worst of all online.

 

"You have no privacy anyway... Get over it." Scott McNealy of Sun Microsystems made that observation in January 1999. It took us all a long time to catch on to the ramifications. The deal has been that we offer up our personal information in exchange for "free" services on the Internet. It took us the better part of two decades to realize how costly "free" is. A handful of firms have gained unbelievable wealth and power; the purveyors of "free" would appear to know more about ourselves than we do.

 

At least public awareness is growing. Lately, articles are appearing in the media lamenting this Faustian bargain. And the European Union breathes fire and fines at the mention of the privacy invaders.

 

You can do your bit to resist. Learn to copy and paste, and MarpX Good Privacy can provide quite adequate protection for your routine messages and social media posts. Your friends get it, the data harvesters don't. For commercial firms and professionals, there is MarpX Better Privacy. And for national security needs, there is MarpX Extreme Encryption™.

People who care about the dignity of the human person

Every person is of value, and worthy of basic respect. Is that just a platitude? Not in this case; please forgive the personal reference, but that insight and commitment is born of seven years and several thousand hours of duty as a volunteer ambulance attendant / first responder. An observation: If we habitually treat people as having an inherent dignity, we lay a foundation for solid relationships. If governments recognize dignity of the person as an irrevocable human right, the result is more stable communities and stronger democracies.

 

In creating tools for human privacy, Marpex Inc. affirms the dignity of the human person as an inalienable right. For example, our MarpX Good Privacy product is free and available for download from anywhere in the world, in the hope that it will tip the balance somewhat more in favor of the common people who live under repressive regimes.

Hackers

Hackers get a lot of bad press, not all of it deserved. The same term, hackers, is used both for those who identify weaknesses and those who intend harm.

 

Those who make their living by hurting people might reflect some quiet evening on the widely held notion that there is some sort of performance appraisal at the end of life. If you believe that is not true, you need to be 100.0 percent sure that you are right and that the millions of people are wrong who believe in a final judgment and that life has something to do with learning to care for other people. Reflection on that is your homework assignment. Now, go away.

 

To hackers who want to identify and share weaknesses, the best we can offer you is bragging rights and free MarpX privacy products. But you would do a tremendous service by kicking the tires of all three (MarpX Good Privacy, MarpX Better Privacy, and Extreme Encryption™). We offer the same challenge given above to cybersecurity firms: "It's time to check out our claim about privacy using Extreme Encryption. A challenge: Encrypt some files yourselves. If you can discover in them patterns that open the way to attacks, get in touch with us [contact@marpx.com or Colonel John Scott Esq. at 740 275-4505]. With this design, it's relatively easy to strengthen the pattern busting without noticable time costs to the user. As for the computational infeasibility part of the claim, that is grounded in high school level arithmetic that you can prove to yourselves in very short order. And if you believe quantum computing will rise to hundred-digit-long quantities of possibile solutions per second, we can in turn scale up our software's strength to multi-thousand-digit-long levels of resistance."

Mark Zuckerberg

Dear Mark:

 

You have an impressive skill: your recognize human foibles and turn them into money. That strength makes it hard for many of us to grasp the extent of a countering weakness -- your inability to understand the effect that you have on others. You appear upset that Congress and the media repeatedly dump on you.

 

Let's be specific. It's your repeated attempts to solve problems through public relations campaigns. Whenever people question your word about your commitment to customer privacy, your P.R. people are off and running again. P.R. can work, but only if the gap between word and reality narrows over time. You have been caught in privacy gaffes so many times that your word is no longer given much weight. Take the mid-2019 P.R. blitz, to the effect that Facebook is going to encrypt people's content and keep it private for them. That sounds great. But, given your history, we have trouble believing that the commitment is real. Is Facebook data mining content before encrypting it? Are you still monetizing people's private information? If that turns out to be the case, Facebook will be in deep, deep trouble.

 

We at Marpex Inc. are going in exactly the opposite direction. We make sure encryption keys are in the hands of the user. At every point we ensure that the customer has control and that their content is kept private, even (especially!) from us as provider. It all comes down to a commitment to the dignity of every person, and respect for the customer.

 

You might try that, Mark. And, goodness knows, with your skills you might find a way to make serious money in the process.

 

Yours truly,

 

Doug Lowry
President, Marpex Inc.

Xi Jinping

Dear Mr Xi:

 

Governance of China is a monumental challenge. Were the fabric of governance to break down, China might well devolve into a maelstrom of conflicts among its many demographic groups. Thus you make a high priority of stability. We understand that, but question the means -- repression, surveillance, rewriting history, attempts to stamp out religion. That last one is of particular interest: the roots of the word "religion" are "re" (meaning "again") and "lig" ("to tie"). Religion is the attempt to tie things back together, that is, to find meaning. You appear determined that the state, and the state alone, shall shape for its 1.4 billion citizens the understanding of the meaning of life.

 

There is a saying that you can do anything with bayonets except sit on them. You have power -- for now. You can force your way -- for now. But time is your enemy. Your people are restive. Through repression you have built up a store of ill-will among the common people. If your strategy continues, you will hasten an inevitable blow-up... perhaps not in your lifetime, but soon.

 

We have done something that we hope disturbs you. Marpex Inc. has released an anti-surveillance tool called Marpx Good Privacy. Despite your regime's tight control of the Internet, we hope that over time it filters into the hands of the common people in China. It's founded on a resilient principle that surfaces again and again in human history -- the notion of the dignity of every human person. That's not power in the authoritarian sense. That's real power, to change human life for the better.

 

Yours truly,

 

Doug Lowry
President, Marpex Inc.

The Supreme Court of the United States of America

Privacy is enshrined in the constitutions of perhaps eighty countries, so it is commonly at least a civil right. In the United States, the constitution does not address privacy directly, but in a 1965 decision (Griswold v. Connecticut) the U.S. Supreme Court found a right to privacy within "the shadows and penumbras" of the constitution, a right specifically intended as a protection against government intrusion.

 

Inevitably, the Supreme Court will be asked repeatedly in the years ahead to refine and to better define the nature of the privacy right. Outstanding issues:

  1. Five and a half decades later in a world of terrorism risk, how far does the right to privacy extend to protection of information against government surveillance?
  2. In light of the explosive growth of the administrative state, are there limits to the nature and quantity of data that may be demanded by government from citizens?
  3. A lingering partisan divide hovers over the "shadows and penumbras" method of judicial decision making and over whether some of the privacy-related decisions made since 1965 even belong to the judiciary rather than to the legislative branch. Add to this tension the circus of political theater that attends every consideration of a new Supreme Court justice nominee. How in this context can we recapture an abiding, generally shared, respect for law?

 

Our suggestion, for what it is worth, is to draw on a more solid foundation. Civil rights by their nature are granted by, and may be rescinded by, government. Universal human rights in contrast are inalienable. The dignity of the human person is one such universal principle. Centering our views and argumentation on this more reliable foundation may help our nation to get past its horrific divisions and move us in the direction of settled and widely respected law.

 

Law is certainly a restraint on the evil we may do. But law can be so much more .. a framework that endows a people with true freedom:

Oh, beautiful for pilgrim feet,
Whose stern, impassioned stress
A thoroughfare of freedom beat
Across the wilderness!
America! America!
God mend thine ev’ry flaw,
Confirm thy soul in self-control,
Thy liberty in law.

A potential collaborator

There is a separate full page on this opportunity.

Site Map

 

MarpX Privacy